Week 2 – Discussion Board 1

Welcome To Interpreters Associates, Inc. Forums Week 2 – Discussion Board 1

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    • #52496
      Avatar photoArt Liebl
      Keymaster

      In at least 250 words, discuss the benefits of doing a pre-session with Yourself, the provider and the patient? What are possible scenarios that might be avoided by doing a pre-session? Do you think it is always necessary to do a pre-session with providers? Reply to two fellow students by Monday.

    • #52698
      Betty Oliver-Pinto
      Participant

      The benefit of doing a pre-session is beneficial for different reasons. One of them are meeting with the doctor prior to meeting with the patient so that you will have information regarding the patient’s case and you will be more aware of the type of conversation and will be able to gain confidence to interpret the conversation with most of the important information that the doctor will be discussing with the patient. It is beneficial to do a pre-session with the patient as well therefor you can have a better understanding of the terminology that you will need to use to interpret with the patient based on the knowledge you get by having a conversation with the patient. This will help with prevent problems later on.

      There are certain situation that you may avoid by doing a pre-session because that is the time that you set down ground rules. It can prevent the patient getting extra friendly and expecting you to give to medical advice and if you have a pre-session you let the patient know at that time that you are there to interpret not to give medical advice. You avoid the challenge of the doctor speaking to you instead of the patient as you will converse in first person. It will also help avoid misinterpret what should be said and how it should be said due to the fact that you will know the patients case and will have better knowledge of the patients vocabulary.

      I think it is necessary to do a pre-session with the provider if you are coming from the outside i.e interpreter from another department or from another facility. In my case I do not feel that it is necessary to have a pre-session with the provider due to the fact that I am his Medical Assistant and I already know the patient’s case and the provider I currently work for would know what I expect to go in the room. I would have a pre-session with the patient so that they knew the lay of the land and know that I change roles from Medical Assistant to Interpreter. I will always make sure that I give the patient and the doctor the same information at the beginning with both of them in the room that what is translated with be confidential and that I will convey the message for both the provider and the patient to understand.

      • #52719

        Betty, very well put. I too agree that if you are freelance interpreter and dont know the provider it is crucial to do the pressesion. If you are from the facility and the providers know you it can be skipped but never skipped with the patient specially if you know them and you are changing roles. It is very important to specify when you are doing what and what the expectations are for each role.

      • #52721
        Miriam Kelly
        Participant

        I don’t think I mentioned the terminology, but that is another important aspect. Of course, we are studying medical terminology, but it is best to get an idea of what specific terminology we will be working with before we get into the actual session.

    • #52700
      Soila Morales
      Participant

      A pre-session is a short introduction between you, the provider, and the patient to introduce all three parties, and to explain what your role will be and how it will work. Usually, you explain how your interpreting skills will be used to help with each patient and the provider. Usually there are 3 parts to the pre-session and those are

      -Pre-session with yourself.

      -Pre-session between patient and provider.

      -Pre-session between all 3 Provider, patient, and patient.

      In all three you are trying to clarify your role and explain how things are expected from each the provider, patient, and yourself. At this time, you will explain how you will be assisting with your services and how you would like to help, also during these pre-sessions you will become more familiar with what the interpretation for the case will be. It helps you know more about the issues and key points of the meeting/appointment.

      In some instances, patients tend to get confused and ask out of place questions or advise that we are not medically certified to do so and at this pre-session time is when those key points are explained to avoid misunderstandings and any disagreements. We must always also remember boundaries between Provider and patient as sometimes we can be seen as “a friend” but that is not the case. These pre-sessions are very important to all three 3 parties to have a successful, professional case, so that all 3 the provider, patient, and yourself know things were communicated to best of the 3 knowledge.

      • #52703
        Betty Oliver-Pinto
        Participant

        Nicely stated, and very true. Always best to know what you are walking into prior. When speaking to doctor you know the case and while speaking to the patient you are in a better understanding on how to interpret the conversation due to the fact you can better understand the form of language the patient uses.

        • #52706
          Angela Mayfield
          Participant

          This is stated great. The importance of a presession is one thing I like to do prior to an appointment and familiarizing my self with the clients case and chatting with the provider.

        • #52724
          Miriam Kelly
          Participant

          Is it common for patients to say you’re not medically qualified to do that? How would they know?

      • #52730
        Sara Abbasova
        Participant

        Very well put Soila! It’s important to always be professional and establish boundaries between patients, many times they may not understand that you are not their friend – you are just there to do your job.

    • #52704
      Miriam Kelly
      Participant

      It is important to clarify who you are and what exactly you’re there to provide, to put it simply. Everyone involved may already know that, but it is important to formally establish that. Some patients may get uneasy about sharing embarrassing information with a third party, i.e., us, (the interpreters), so this pre-session helps eliminate that uneasiness. It is of the utmost importance that they don’t hide anything. It is more likely that patients will hide things or not explain things fully if they are embarrassed, so the pre-session will help avoid that. Patients may or may not be familiar with medical interpreters, so this is our chance to assure them that we are professionals in this field and that they do not have to worry. We know the procedures, ethics, responsibilities, vocabulary, etc. This provides essential reassurance and comfort for all parties involved.
      The book talks about the self-pre-session being the most important. I can see how this is the case because we need to go into our jobs prepared for the situations. When I was a teacher, I prepared my class thoroughly. Not only did I come up with a lesson plan, but I also anticipated what type of problems would come up. I would prepare difficult words or phrases ahead of time to teach them or for them to teach themselves. Sometimes I would be a substitute, so I would think about the level and suitability of extra activities and so on. So, to cut my blathering down; I had to prepare my mind and get ready for the situation or potential situation ahead of me.
      In my opinion, the pre-session is very important, but if a person is near death, then, I think I think an in-depth “patient” pre-session can be skipped. Interpreters still need to establish who they are. I don’t think there is time for an extended pre-session if a patient is flatlining.

      • #52708
        Betty Oliver-Pinto
        Participant

        Being prepare is always best. Some cases are harder than others and being able to know the situation prior to walking into it is is important.

      • #52713
        Soila Morales
        Participant

        Very true, not many feel comfortable telling the providers certain things and just seeing us in that room sometimes makes it more uncomfortable it is always nice to have that little bit of time to try and make them feel a bit at ease.

      • #52720

        Hi Miriam, that is all very true and well explained. I want to tie two points together that you brought up. The pressesion with yourself is very important to prepare yourself for any scenario including that of neardeath. In those cases not only should you prepare emotionally as the subject of matter is tougher but also prepare to interpret to family members as more often than not patients in that condition will be acompanied. So instead of skipping it is actually more important to do presession so family members know what to expect and it doesnt get messy with he said and she said and not everyone feels like they can all talk at the same time. With bigger groups its easiest to have them assign 1 person to do the speaking and the flow is smoother.

        • #52722
          Miriam Kelly
          Participant

          I see that you are the moderator. Are you an experienced interpreter? I am curious.

        • #52723
          Miriam Kelly
          Participant

          I was trying to think of a situation where the pre-session could be skipped. Near death came to mind due to the “ultimate” urgency of the situation, but I see what you are saying. I was thinking you don’t need to spend too much time explaining who you are if it causes life-saving time to be lost.

        • #52752

          Hi Miriam, yes I am. I have been a medical interpreter for 10 years, I got certified by this school as well and now I am one of the Spanish coaches =]

    • #52705
      Angela Mayfield
      Participant

      The benefits of doing a pre-session is to help better understand your patient and to better help with interpreting. This helps you as the interpreter lay it all out. What is the patient here for what are some challenges that either could face, for this would especially be helpful in behavioral Health. It is a way for the Dr and patient to have a better understanding and less of miscommunication. It gives you as the interpreter a better way to prepare yourself to be a great interpreter. It is a way of doing the prep work before actually entering the room to interpret for the client. Having the ground work completed for a successful encounter with a client.
      Having a presession with a patient and provider, can help with any challenges. Following protocols (CEFF) It will help avoid many problems.

      I think doing a season with providers gives you a chance to discuss the patient and any issues he or she may be dealing with. Confidentiality is everything and letting the client know that it is discussed is completely confidential, being HIPPA compliant is extremely important. It is very important for the client to know that you are here for them. Having a level of professionalism is very important. Introducing yourself and as the interpreter and allowing them to have a better understanding so they are comfortable. That’s why having a pre-session is so important for you as the interpreter and Doctor and patient, to ensure a smooth session and line of communication for all.

      • #52707
        Betty Oliver-Pinto
        Participant

        I agree with what you are saying it is good to know a little prior and not walk into the unknown. Interpreting is not the easiest especially when you have no idea what the situation is.

        • #52711
          Miriam Kelly
          Participant

          I like how you talk about having a smooth session. The preparation helps to avoid problems or a disaster. I avoided a lot of problems (not all) with my preparation as a teacher. There are always going to be unforeseen challenges, but there are things you can do to help things go more smoothly.

      • #52714
        Soila Morales
        Participant

        Completely agree that we save ourselves from many situations by following the CEFF, also it is always good to explain we are HIPPA compliant to make the party feel a bit more comfortable and trustworthy with us.

      • #52741
        Cynthia Rodriguez
        Participant

        It is really important that the client feels safe and that they know their privacy is important to us. Informing the client about their rights and letting them know you are there to get the correct information across to them. Great post!

    • #52727
      Miriam Kelly
      Participant

      On a different note, I checked an answer and it didn’t register. I submitted the quiz and it got marked as wrong. Is there a way to get a prompt to make sure that all answers are marked before it allows you to submit the quiz?

    • #52728
      Cynthia Rodriguez
      Participant

      Some benefits of doing a pre-session is that you will not be jumping into the situation without knowing what the session will be about. You might be able to discuss with the doctor the subject you will be discussing and as well as some key points that the doctor might want for you to address to their patent. This will help you know what kind of language you might use for the interpretation, in case you might need a refresher on some words specific to the session. In addition doing a pre –session with the patient is also important because they get to know who the interpreter is and how the session is to go and answer any question they might have prior to the actual appointment. Some possible scenarios that might be avoided by doing a pre-session is any confusions, letting the patient know what your role is and that you are not a medical professional in case that comes up. As well as everything being discussed is confidential, I think letting the client know this is very important so they feel comfortable discussing everything they need to their medical provider. I believe it should always be necessary if it is a new patient that has never used a translator have a pre-session so that they understand what to expect. I understand that sometimes medical providers do not have time for pre-sessions but, if they can make time then it would benefit not only them but he client as well. In order to make sure that everyone is on the same page.

      • #52731
        Sara Abbasova
        Participant

        I love how you said that it’s important that the patient knows that you are not a medical professional and that what is being discussed is confidential. Many may feel like their privacy is being invaded, by making them comfortable and establishing a rapport will make the appointment go smoothly.

    • #52729
      Sara Abbasova
      Participant

      By doing a pre-session with yourself, you are laying the groundwork for a successful encounter. Thinking about what kind of appointment it is and what terminology might be used will be very helpful, you are able to research a few unknown terms or review some material so that it is fresh in your mind. An interpreter needs to be quick on their feet and have a good memory, being prepared shows that you are professional and helps you have a smooth session with both the provider and the patient.

      By doing a pre-session with the provider and the patient, you can explain who you are and establish boundaries. As an interpreter, you are only there you convey the information from one person to the other, a mediator in a way, and not there to give personal opinions. The doctor must be speaking to the patient and not the interpreter, and the patient must also speak to the doctor because they are the ones who are having the conversation.

      I don’t think it’s always necessary to do a pre-session with providers, you should definitely introduce yourself previously, but if you know the provider unless they have a specific concern they’d like to address with the patient, it’s alright to proceed without speaking beforehand.

      • #52739
        Cynthia Rodriguez
        Participant

        I like how you stated that laying down that groundwork first is important to have a great first meeting. It is important to note that we won’t know all of the terminology at the top of our head, which is why having that pre-session is so important.

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