Week 1 – Discussion Board 2

Welcome To Interpreters Associates, Inc. Forums Week 1 – Discussion Board 2

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    • #52548
      Avatar photoArt Liebl
      Keymaster

      In at least 250 words, think about the difference between an interpreter and translator. What are the biggest differences? What are the challenges of each? Why is it important to understand that an interpreter is not a translator? Reply to two fellow students by Monday.

    • #53406
      Yasmin DeOliveira
      Participant

      Interpreters and translator are definitely similar and I could see why some people confuse the two as did I previously. The biggest difference between an interpreter and a translator is the knowledge they carry in their second language, for example, a translator may be able to fully carry a conversation and translate within slangs to get the point across, whereas an interpreter has a deeper understanding of each term that needs to be translated. An interpreter has to study and fully understand medical terms in both languages to be able to explain throughly and answer questions a patient may have. An interpreter also has the duty of telling you every information that is given to you exactly as is, whereas a translator can choose what to tell you and how to tell you. The biggest challenge for a translator is not being given the knowledge to fully understand the information they are told to pass on beforehand, they are then forced to come up with alternative ways to get the information across and sometimes end up using direct translations without being able to explain the context behind it. I believe the biggest challenge for an interpreter is the mistranslation of polysemy. In some languages there are so many meanings to a word that it may be hard at times to understand what is the correct translation and what terms to use. Another challenge may also be the direct translation of drug names and treatments that may not exist in other countries, unfortunately that is out of their control but it still may be a problem faced. I believe the most important reason to understand that an interpreter is in fact NOT a translator is their merits, all the terminology they have learned, and their ability to translate in fully understandable terms. An interpreter is also certified with credentials whereas a translator is simply a bilingual person. An interpreter has merely put in the time and efforts to achieve their title and deserves to not be compared.

      • #53409
        Avatar photoMargareth Cruz
        Participant

        Hi Yasmin,

        While reading your post, I found your perspective very interesting. The challenges you described are some that I thought of as well. A challenge that I did not think about was the translation of certain drug names. It is true that many other countries do not have the same drugs as the U.S.I found it very interesting that you brought that up. I agree with you when you mentioned that the difference is the knowledge that both and interpreter and translator has. I enjoyed reading your post!

      • #53414
        Sherley Montes
        Participant

        Hello! I completely agree on what you said and I can relate. Prior to educating myself and reading into the differences between an interpreter and a translator I definitely confused the two. I loved reading your thoughts and perspective on this!

    • #53408
      Avatar photoMargareth Cruz
      Participant

      The difference between both an interpreter and a translator is that an interpreter grasps the information that is given and relays the information to the patient in a way that they understand. A translator translates word for word without any understanding or explanation. An interpreter is one who becomes an advocate for those with a language barrier and helps that patient understand the information given to them from the medical personnel. Upon further research, translators are used more often on transcribing written information, such as textbooks, websites, etc. Interpreters use spoken language to get a message across from one party to another.

      The biggest challenge of an interpreter is not being able to hear the parties speaking in a certain environment. Without hearing what the parties are saying, you delay the time that is allotted for the visit and may have to ask for repetitions. Also, when hearing, it can be challenging as a mediator when either party speaks in a low voice or when they speak too fast. Sometimes, speaking too fast may not help the interpreter to comprehend everything to be able to relay the information to someone else. On the other hand, translators may have problems with translating figures of speech, conveying tones and diction, as well as having words or phrases that do not have a translation from one language to another. For example, in spanish, you can say, “no le busques tres patas al gato” which has much meaning and if a translator were to read that and try to transcribe the message, it would say “Don’t look for three feet on the cat” which does not make sense at all. An interpreter would hear that idiom and say “Do not complicate matters”. These are some of the challenges that both an interpreter and a translator would face.

      It is crucial to understand why an interpreter is not a translator because interpreters are advocates and mediators who convey a message in a way that the person they are aiding could understand. A translator would do no such thing. A translator transcribes from one language to another with no worry about the audience’s understanding and comprehension.

      • #53415
        Sherley Montes
        Participant

        Hello Margareth! I agree on how an interpreter is an advocate for for those with a language barrier and I believe it is very crucial that they receive the help and understanding they need. I also loved your example about the three feet on a cat and see how that can be translated incorrectly when not interpreted with meaning.

      • #53420
        Yasmin DeOliveira
        Participant

        Hi Margareth! Interesting point on how translation is written and interpreters is spoken language, that is definitely a point I did not think of. I agree that it is definitely a challenge to translate figures of speech, and quite honestly is going to be the hardest part to work on. Loved how you showed the difference very clearly!

    • #53412
      Sherley Montes
      Participant

      There are various differences between an interpreter and a translator. A translator is known for transcribing everything word for word. In many cases something that is translated word for word does not make sense when translating to another language. An interpreter practices interpreting everything that is said in a way that makes sense and that also projects the meaning. Not only do interpreters interpret what is being said verbally but also including nonverbal cues.Therefore an interpreters job is to figure out the best way to relay a message so it is being understood and presented correctly.

      One of the major challenges of interpreting is definitely the memory retention skills and learning medical terminology. There are so many different medical terms that come into play when interpreting. As an interpreter you need to be able to apply your knowledge as well as learn new information. Over time an interpreter learns more with experience and gains higher memory retention. As an interpreter with no experience they may face complex situations where he/she does not have the experience or skill to accurately interpret what is being said.
      In addition, a major challenge for a translator is not having the correct knowledge and terms to be able to transcribe something. Translators have a higher chance of things being portrayed incorrectly because they lack the skill and terminology necessary to interpret the meaning behind what is actually being said. Although translators are bilingual and are able to translate various words and meanings, some lack the skills needed to translate one language to another in order for it to make sense and the use of accurate terminology.

      It is important to understand that an interpreter is not a translator because an interpreter has crucial responsibilities opposed to a translator. For example, a medical interpreter also works as an advocate to the client/ patient. Advocacy is important because interpreters are able to communicate on both behalfs to have a good end result. It is important that a person is being told accurately and in depth what is being said in order for them to be comfortable and understand everything that is happening.

      • #53413
        Avatar photoMargareth Cruz
        Participant

        Hi Sherley,

        I agree with your post. I like how you brought up retention and memory. That definitely plays a huge part in interpreting. Medical terminology can also be a challenge only because one may forget the term to use in the moment and may struggle to collect their thoughts. I enjoyed your perspective.

      • #53421
        Yasmin DeOliveira
        Participant

        Hi Sherley! I loved your post! I did not think of the nonverbal cues that need interpretation so it is very interesting to see it brought up. Also interesting memory retention being brought up, another point I did not think about but that is probably one of the biggest challenges faced. I really enjoyed reading this post!

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