Week 1 – Discussion Board 2

Welcome To Interpreters Associates, Inc. Forums Week 1 – Discussion Board 2

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    • #52548
      Avatar photoArt Liebl
      Keymaster

      In at least 250 words, think about the difference between an interpreter and translator. What are the biggest differences? What are the challenges of each? Why is it important to understand that an interpreter is not a translator? Reply to two fellow students by Monday.

    • #52655
      Betty Oliver-Pinto
      Participant

      Some of the biggest difference between an interpreter and a translator are, being an interpreter you are interpreting in a live setting whether is it over the phone, in person, or virtual. As an interpreter you are conveying the message from more than one party and you are doing it live if you are a translator you are to translate in writing and have time to translate and can use a device to help translate using word for word.

      As an interpreter the main concern is to covey the message so that the content of the message is understood, As a translator you have to translate in writing word for word, but you are able to use a device and are able to do so taking your time. While you are interpreting you are showing expression, you are interpreting the message with the correct content, however in a way that the receiver is able to understand as some of the terms are more difficult for the receiver to understand as they may not be used by them in a typical conversation.

      There are challenges to doing both. As an interpreter it is in real time and the conversation can be fast and you have to convey the message by explaining or giving definition and there are times that the translation uses words that are not the proper word they are either the meaning or a word that the receiver may better understand. The challenge of being a translator is that it is time consuming and has to be straight across word for word

      It is important to understand the difference between the two because one is verbal conveying a message in a way the receiver can understand in real time and the other is written and can use machines and technology to better assist the translator It is important to know the difference between the two because they both carry different responsibilities.

      • #52670
        Angela Mayfield
        Participant

        I do feel that as an interpreter you are conveying a message and making sure that it is understood. There are challenges to both and understanding the cha;;enges is important as well.

      • #52676
        Cynthia Rodriguez
        Participant

        Hello Betty, I agree that there are challenges to doing both and at the end of the day it is important that the responsibility and outcome are completed.

      • #52681
        Miriam Kelly
        Participant

        Having to interpret on the spot is a big difference I think we all talked about. Translation can be done word for word with a device, but it is not a good idea. I think we all know it is not a good idea. It may be okay to use it and clean it up afterwards, but I still think that is not ideal. When I have had to translate, sometimes I would put my work into a translator after I already translated to quickly see if I made a mistake or worded something awkwardly. I would have translated something in to my second or third language on my own, and then I would plug it into the translator to translate it into my first language. I called it reverse translation.

    • #52660
      Cynthia Rodriguez
      Participant

      Some differences between an interpreter and a translator are that an interpreter is interpreting orally to someone else physically and this could be at a doctor’s office, dentist, the bank. While a translator is translating written materials into the desired language, this could be medical documents, financial documents. The biggest differences I see is an interpreter is in a live setting interpreting on the spot while translating is written material and translating into another language. Some challenges of each are that for an interpreter, you often must be quick and interpret the response on the spot and you might not have enough time to look up some words you are unsure of. Also, another challenge is making sure what you are responding back to the other person also understands. Challenges of a translator is that you must make sure that the written material you are translating is accurate and the wording is correct in the language you are translating. Some phrases might be completely different in one language versus the other, so making sure the message is being understood is important. It is important to understand that an interpreter is not a translator because they both use different skill sets and they both are being done in different settings. It is important to know the differences because when someone needs an interpreter, they need to make sure they have someone who is qualified in their specific skill set whether it be interpreting or translating, at the end of the day you want to make sure you are helping the individual requesting the services.

      • #52661
        Betty Oliver-Pinto
        Participant

        I agree. When you are interpreting you have to think fast on your feet. I learned how to speak Spanish by asking how to say words and then learned by watching telenovelas. I am now fluent in Spanish I am also able to write and read it. I think when I try and use google translate it sometimes is put in a different way then we would actually express it. Also while interpreting it is difficult if both people are speaking at the same time to get the point across to either party. As well I agree that we need to be keen and skilled in the area we are interpreting.

        • #52671
          Angela Mayfield
          Participant

          I agree with this also Betty. I do feel that it is important to be keen and skilled in the areas we are interpreting.

      • #52693
        Sara Abbasova
        Participant

        Interpreters need quick thinking and reflexes, sometimes there is not enough time to find a word that you need, but you can explain it in a different way so that the person understands the main message that is being presented to them.

    • #52665
      Miriam Kelly
      Participant

      While many people use both terms interchangeably, an interpreter translates the spoken word, while a translator translates the written word. I think it is important to understand the difference because they have different responsibilities. When I studied in the Portuguese department, I focused on second language learning, but my friends focused on translating literary works. Translating literary work is not as straight forward, but that is not to say one could not translate a biography or something like that (which would be more technical and to the point). People who have limited or no English that have to go to court or go to hospital, for example, need interpreters to help them understand what is going on. There are a lot of people that find themselves in emergency situations, and they need interpreter to help guide them. The interpreter has to do the work on the spot, while the translator has time to come up with a translation. Interpreters often work with a lot of technical vocabulary; that could be easier or more difficult depending on how you look at it. I noticed that my friends who did translation worked with a lot of “colorful” and archaic language. People do not speak like Shakespeare, so the likelihood of me using the types of terms that my friends used in my new career is very miniscule. There are a lot of terms that are nearly impossible to translate in literary work, but it is easier to find an equivalent when one is interpreting.

      • #52668
        Betty Oliver-Pinto
        Participant

        I feel interpreting is easier said then done, however it is very important for the community. I feel the same about translating. Even though we can use machines to help us to translate some times they are words that we do not use on the daily.

      • #52686
        Soila Morales
        Participant

        Agree with term interchangeably, many times the Individual seeking the service is not sure of what the correct term is.

    • #52669
      Angela Mayfield
      Participant

      There are many differences between translation and interpretation. Translation focuses more on written content. Interpretation deals with the spoken word and is delivered immediately. It prioritizes understanding and communication over perfection. The biggest difference between interpretation and translation is each: interpreters translate spoken language orally, while translators translate written words.

      I feel that some of the challenges involved is the inability to understand the speaker, could be due to accent, inability to deliver or failed equipment, to which interpreters cannot interpret what they can’t hear. Translators are required to maintain a higher level of accuracy as opposed to interpreters that are not required to have such a higher level of accuracy, because they are conveying a message. Interpreters are usually paid by the hour or day, whereas translators are normally paid by the word or page.

      Interpreters and translators both also have some similar characteristics. It is important to have the proper linguistics and similar skills to appropriately interpret or translate. Interpreters have to focus on the job, because they have to listen intently to the speaker and quickly process the ideas and thoughts received and readily listen to the next set of information given. A translator can translate chunks of information from a document and at their own pace. I feel that both have a job to do and both are required to have similar skills and different skills. Ultimately they each have a purpose of relaying information and conveying the message across in the targeted language and helping communicate efficiently.

      • #52672
        Betty Oliver-Pinto
        Participant

        Enjoyed reading your answers they were written in a way to better understand the differences.

      • #52673
        Miriam Kelly
        Participant

        I think the inability to understand due to accent or other factors is key. I remember the story in the reading about someone having the wrong organ removed. While I can’t imagine the wrong organ being removed in the translation field, there is still potential for serious consequences and grave danger. I think translating a medicine label wrong is less likely, but that could also lead to a very risky outcome.

      • #52677
        Cynthia Rodriguez
        Participant

        Hello Angela, I agree that both jobs have an important role in relaying information and message in order to help others and that community. Both have different skills they use as well as similarities.

      • #52687
        Soila Morales
        Participant

        YES! interpreters do have to because they have to listen intently to the speaker and quickly process the ideas and thoughts received and readily listen to the next set of information given you are so right with this; Translating seems a bit easier.

      • #52692
        Sara Abbasova
        Participant

        I honestly had not even thought about equipment and accent, good catch! I am always around people who have different accents so for me it’s not very difficult to understand, but I have an African friend who most people have trouble understanding what he says and it’s quite frustrating.

    • #52682
      Soila Morales
      Participant

      An interpreter interprets verbal communication between one language to another and are mediums when language barriers are an issue. A translator makes sure that your original message gets to the reader exactly as it was meant to with no changes in vocabulary to help the person have a better understanding.

      An interpreter will interpret to the best of his or her knowledge to help the person understand what they are trying to get across to the listener, as a translator will only translate what is needed and what is told with no help to give a better explanation. It is important to understand the difference between these two because one is a bit more challenging in the way that an interpreter many times has to think out of the box to explain certain interpretations for the listener to be able to comprehend. A translator just goes with the correct translation and that is all.

      It is very important to understand the differences between these two so that you are able to get through to the listener in the best way, many time the listeners do not have the medical knowledge to understand certain medical terms, that is when an interpreter helps make a difference because we are able to explain a bit, as to a translator just translates only what is said. Some of the challenges we might come across are being understood, as there are many different cultures and ways of interpreting certain words or phrases, interpreting the exact word or phrase might sometimes leave the listener a bit confused.

    • #52691
      Sara Abbasova
      Participant

      There are many differences between interpretation and translation, though the two terms are erroneously used interchangeably.

      Translation focuses on the written content, and most translators use computer-aided tools in their work. Translation services are text-based, can happen long after the source text is created, and requires a higher level of accuracy, the work is done mostly in one direction – in the translator’s mother tongue.

      Interpretation is dealt with the spoken word, it happens at the moment with no help from outside sources such as reference materials. Interpreters need to transpose what is being said in the source language, preserving its original meaning but using different idioms, contexts, and more culturally-specific references so that the target audience understands. Usually, an interpreter’s only resources are reflexes and a good memory. Interpretation requires a lower level of accuracy for translation, it can happen on the phone, via video, or in person. Interpreters must be fluent in both languages (source and target language) because they are required to translate in both directions instantaneously without any help while capturing the tone, inflections, and other elements while conveying verbal cues to the target audience.

      It’s important to understand that an interpreter is not a translator because interpretation involves a deeper knowledge of cultural aspects, reading the person’s emotions, and conveying them to another. The translation is plain and simple, you take something and change it word for word into another, but interpreting, you have to consider the environment. Interpreting goes beyond a mere translation, it’s more of an explanation of what the person meant. Anyone can be a translator, but not everyone can be an interpreter.

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