Week 1 – Discussion Board 1

Welcome To Interpreters Associates, Inc. Forums Week 1 – Discussion Board 1

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    • #52545
      Avatar photoArt Liebl
      Keymaster

      In 250 words talk about yourself. Where do you live? What languages do you speak? Why have you decided to become an interpreter? Reply to 2 other students by Monday night.

    • #52644
      Avatar photoArt Liebl
      Keymaster

      Welcome to week 1! This first week is to get you used to the online platform and for you to get to know each other!

      Your instructor for this week is Art Liebl. Please feel to connect to me through my email, or the button, “Contact Instructor” with any issues you may encounter this week.

      Here are your assignments for the week:

      1. Weekly Reading: Read chapter 1 from the manual. Please translate any and all terminology in the chapter- translating English terminology into your target language.

      2. Discussion Board Topics: From the dashboard, scroll down to Week 1 – Posting #1 and posting #2. Please respond to the initial question from the instructor. During the week, bounce off other students’ comments, or the instructor’s comments. By the end of the week, you should have an initial posting and 2 other postings based on other students or the instructor.

      3. Weekly Quiz: Take the first quiz- week one. It is auto graded

      4. No written assignment

      Instructor: Art Liebl
      Instructor email: aliebl@interpretersassociates.com

      Week starts: September 6, 2022
      Week ends: September 12 at midnight

      If you have any technical problems or questions: aliebl@interpretersassociates.com

      • #52662
        Miriam Kelly
        Participant

        Hi,

        My name is Miriam. I live in Somerville, Massachusetts. I speak English, Spanish, and Portuguese. I have lived in Brazil and other countries in Latin America. I did volunteer work and teaching. I have wanted to become an interpreter for a while. I have always been drawn to analyzing and teaching languages. I applied to jobs in the past with no success. I thought the courses were too expensive at the time. I have come to my senses now. It was much more expensive to get all my degrees, and I am not getting a return on my investment for them.

    • #52645
      Betty Oliver-Pinto
      Participant

      My name is Betty, I am a Medical Assistant at Roger Williams for the Surgical Oncology department. I have been employed with Roger Williams for two years. I live in Providence, Rhode Island. I speak Spanish as a second language and English as my first, I moved here two years ago from Arizona where I was a pediatric Medical Assistant and then changed professions and became a Rose farmer then decided that I needed a change of scenery and moved across the country.I moved here to Rhode Island with my husband and my youngest son who has Down’s Syndrome. I have 3 sons and 1 daughter and 4 granddaughters who live in Arizona.

      I am taking this course to become an interpreter because I am a compassionate person and I love being a Medical Assistant and helping people. I feel being an interpreter and having the means to do it face to face is more personable and the patients feel a sense of care and that we are interested in their health. As I work daily with Spanish speaking patients who are not getting the best news and not being able to translate it in person can be overwhelming for the patient and me as well as I see the looks on their face as they are getting the news from a telephone translator.

      As I become a certified interpreter I will be able to grow in my career and be able to use my skills in Speaking Spanish and helping people daily. Patient care and their understandings of their treatment whether it be surgery or chemotherapy or radiation is very important, as and interpreter I will be able to help our patients understand what the plan of care is and it will be on a personal level. I have chosen to this as many times our Spanish speaking patients ask for me to interpret what the doctor has to say and I have to tell them that I am not allowed to interpret due to the fact that I am not a certified interpreter.

      • #52648
        Avatar photoArt Liebl
        Keymaster

        Welcome on Board Betty! It is so nice to have you with us and especially with the knowledge you bring to the table. I am looking forward to your future posts! Good studies to you!

        Art

        • #52652
          Betty Oliver-Pinto
          Participant

          Thank you Mr.Liebl I appreciate your response I look forward to continue my studies and to become a certified interpreter.

      • #52656
        Angela Mayfield
        Participant

        Welcome betty, its great to be a part of this class. I look forward to learning this and getting to know everyone in this group.

        • #52666
          Betty Oliver-Pinto
          Participant

          Hi Angela welcome look forward to getting to know you as well.

      • #52679
        Cynthia Rodriguez
        Participant

        Hello Betty, I agree that it is important that a patient is able to understand their treatments and is able to ask questions knowing an interpreter is available.

    • #52649
      Soila Morales
      Participant

      My name is Soila I am 30 years old and live in Providence RI, I come from a Guatemalan Spanish speaking family and even though I was born here in Providence, English was my second language as my home growing up was Spanish speaking only. I currently work for an Oncology Surgeon that is very devoted to his Hispanic community. My job title is a community outreach coordinator at Roger Williams Medical Center and my main population is the Hispanic community, making them feel comfortable and being able to explain everything as best to my knowledge is important to me. Just as I know it is important to them to understand everything in the best way possible.

      I speak fluent English and Spanish which is why I have decided to become certified to be able to help more of my Doctors Patients when medical interpretation is needed. I also have very horrible memories of me being a little kid of about 5/6 years of age and having to interpret for my mother at medical settings and school meetings with teachers and other adults, not that it was a bad thing because now I understand how much interpreters are needed in multiple settings for Hispanic communities. Taking this course will help me use proper terms and not the wrong interpretations as we know there are “slang words” that we misuse when trying to help interpret which are sometimes nonexistent in a dictionary, I hope to understand as much as I can in the coming weeks to improve my interpretation abilities and use the correct medical terms.

      • #52678
        Cynthia Rodriguez
        Participant

        Hello Solia, I agree it can be very hard for young children to have to translate for family as at that age you are learning new words as well and you want to make sure both parties understand what is going on.

      • #52689
        Sara Abbasova
        Participant

        Hello Soila, I know that feeling too well! I have accompanied many friends and their family members, as well as people whom I don’t even know to various medical appointments simply because they did not speak the language. It can be very frustrating, especially as a young child to help others to fill out documents or explain what they are feeling to the doctor. Interpreters are always needed and they are a vital part to the medical community!

    • #52651
      Cynthia Rodriguez
      Participant

      Hello, my name is Cynthia Rodriguez and I live on the coast in Coos Bay, Oregon, I speak Spanish and English. The reason I decided to become an interpreter is because I work for the Public Health department for my county and we serve a diverse population and I see the high need for interpreters in my community. My specific role is the Public Health Emergency Preparedness Manager and I hope to be able to better serve those who need help translating and make them feel heard and be able to answer their questions. Growing up I understood how important it is to be able to have interpreters and especially in medical settings. I would help my parents, grandparents, uncles and aunts whenever they needed help at their doctor’s appointments and helping them fill out forms during their visits as well. As many families who might not fully speak English and need translating they often ask help from their children or other family members who know both, but not everyone is fortunate enough to have that kind of help. That is another reason why I want to become an interpreter, for those who don’t have someone to help them out and as well to educate myself in those harder medical terms that I would not normally use when speaking to my family. It is important to give the technical and correct term when translating to reduce any confusion or miscommunication. I look forward to starting this course and improving my skills.

      • #52653
        Betty Oliver-Pinto
        Participant

        Hi soila,
        I am glad that we are part of this together. It nice to be able to have someone to help me verify my pronunciation and to verify I am using the correct words and not just slang.

        I remember when I would work for a Pediatric office and they children were the ones who would interpret their own care to their parents I would always feel bad this is what made me become more fluent in medical terminology and to continue to practice my Spanish daily. Thank you for all you do.

        • #52683
          Soila Morales
          Participant

          Hey Betty, yes very happy to help and now you will see how hard it is to have to use the “proper Spanish” and not the Spanish we learn out of school.

      • #52654
        Betty Oliver-Pinto
        Participant

        Hi Cynthia,
        Sorry I posted my response to Soila on your discussion but welcome and I look forward to learning from you as well. I am glad that you are doing this for your community. I feel as if it is too much pressure for children to have to translate for their parents especially if the diagnoses or the out come is not the best it is too much stress on the child and the adult.

      • #52657
        Angela Mayfield
        Participant

        Hi Cynthia, Its so great to be a part of this class with you. I look forward to learning and being a part of this.

      • #52664
        Miriam Kelly
        Participant

        Hi Soila,

        I have seen kids interpret for parents. I had a job where people asked to have their kids interpret for them, but I would let them know that I speak their language (albeit with a nonnative accent). I was curious if you had ever been to Guatemala, and if your parents speak another language in addition to Spanish. When I volunteered in Guatemala, I noticed that many people spoke Spanish as a second language. I think about half of them speak an Indigenous language as a first language. I apologize if my curiosity is going off the charts.

        • #52684
          Soila Morales
          Participant

          Hi Miriam, and no need to apologize! I have been to Guatemala on many occasions and yes, many other dialects are spoken, but sadly we only speak Spanish there is no dialects in the region of Guatemala of where we are from. It is very impressive to hear the dialects though.

    • #52658
      Angela Mayfield
      Participant

      Hello, My name is Angela Mayfield and I Am 44 years old. I have been raised in this small rural coastal town of Coquille, Oregon. I have lived here my whole life, I have raised both my kids here, and wouldn’t have it any other way. I love to camp and go hunting and fishing. I have been born and raised in the outdoors. I have two kids, my son is 22 and my daughter is 14.Being a mom and raising my kids in my multicultural world and showing them what’s out there. My parents worked hard for what they have. I too like to instill the same values in my kids.

      I work in Behavioral Health and Public Health. I speak English and Spanish as second languages. Both my parents spoke Spanish growing up. I do interpret a lot within my job for both Behavioral Health and Public Health. We have only one Spanish speaking therapist in this county and I truly wish we had more, as there is such a need here. I am taking this course to receive my certificate and would benefit from helping others in need. I am also a back up Oregon Health Plan Assister and help others receive services for medicaid. I also help translate for clients that are in need of others services and direct them to the appropriate community partners.I love being able to utilize my bilingual skills to help others that are in need. Working in this field has truly opened my eyes to the need for bilingual translators. I look forward to this class and utilizing my certificate.

      • #52675
        Miriam Kelly
        Participant

        Hi Angela,
        It looks like you have found yourself a niche. One of my first roommates was from Oregon. I think she wanted to learn Spanish because of her adopted brother. She studied abroad as a high school student, and as a result, spoke better Spanish than all of the nonnative students in college. Perhaps I should tell my friends that are looking for work to move there (after you get your certificate).

      • #52685
        Soila Morales
        Participant

        Hi Angela, great to see you have the dedication to want to help the Hispanic community, we would think it would be easy to see more help in this field but sadly it is limited.

      • #52690
        Sara Abbasova
        Participant

        Hello Angela! I am very glad that you are doing this course in order to help others, that is very kind and thoughtful of you. Seems to me like you are a great person, as well as a great professional. I’ve noticed a great need for Spanish-speaking interpreters, especially in medical settings.

    • #52663
      Miriam Kelly
      Participant

      Let me add to this because my intro was not 250 words. I am looking to be an interpreter in Portuguese. I did teaching and/or volunteer work in Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras, Peru, and Brazil. My husband is Brazilian, and I speak Portuguese every day. My work experience has mostly been in the customer service and teaching fields. I have taught people of all ages. Most of the teaching I have done has been in the ESL field. I have taught Portuguese classes and one Spanish class to a child.
      I did not grow up in a multilingual household. I grew up with multilingual friends, and I worked with multilingual individuals. Additionally, I have studied, and I have been immersed in other languages for a number of years.

      • #52667
        Betty Oliver-Pinto
        Participant

        Hi Angela nice to see that you did teachings in other countries that is amazing. Welcome to the class.I want to learn Portuguese one day. Here in Rhode Island there are a lot of people who speak Portuguese there are some words that are similar in Spanish. Good luck on future and look forward to hearing more from you.

        • #52674
          Miriam Kelly
          Participant

          I was able to understand Portuguese before I could speak it from my eight years of Spanish study (I can’t speak for others, though). At one point, I worked with a lot of Brazilians, and I would speak to them in Spanish, and they would respond in Portuguese. Of course, I don’t need to do that anymore. Thank you, and welcome to you too!

    • #52688
      Sara Abbasova
      Participant

      Hello, My name is Sara Abbasova. I am 20 years old. I was born in Moscow, Russia, and have lived in many countries including Ukraine, Paraguay, Brazil, and Portugal. I spent most of my life in Brazil and am now in the US.
      I live in Marlborough, Massachusetts. For me, it’s hard to explain how many languages I speak, fluently I only consider Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, French, and English, but I also know Italian, Ukrainian, Mandarin, and Korean though not as well.
      My father is a missionary and a translator, my mother also works alongside him, and my grandmother was a teacher of languages – she taught french at a university in Uzbekistan. Coming from a multicultural family, my mother is Chinese/Uzbek/Russian and my father is Azeri/Iranian, speaking many languages is in my blood you could say – I’ve always had a lot of ease with learning languages, by the age of two, I was learning my fourth language.
      Being a translator and interpreter has come naturally to me. My father used to oversee groups of people that spoke Russian when they came to Brazil to visit, I used to go along and I would grab a few of those people and be their interpreter at the mere age of five years old.
      I work as a nursing assistant at the moment and by becoming an interpreter, I can work from home doing something I am passionate about which also does not require much from me physically. In my job, I am able to speak to many patients because of my skills. I can listen to them and convey the message to the nurses and doctors about what they need. I am very grateful to be able to know and speak many languages that sometimes are difficult to find translators for, but now I want to focus on just interpreting as opposed to doing my job as a CNA AND a translator/interpreter.

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