Week 1 – Discussion Board 1

Welcome To Interpreters Associates, Inc. Forums Week 1 – Discussion Board 1

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    • #52545
      Avatar photoArt Liebl
      Keymaster

      In 250 words talk about yourself. Where do you live? What languages do you speak? Why have you decided to become an interpreter? Reply to 2 other students by Monday night.

    • #53399
      Avatar photoMargareth Cruz
      Participant

      Welcome to week 1! This first week is to get you used to the online platform and for you to get to know each other!

      Your instructor for this week is Art Liebl. Please feel to connect to me through my email, or the button, “Contact Instructor” with any issues you may encounter this week.

      Here are your assignments for the week:

      1. Weekly Reading: Read chapter 1 from the manual. Please translate any and all terminology in the chapter- translating English terminology into your target language.

      2. Discussion Board Topics: From the dashboard, scroll down to Week 1 – Posting #1 and posting #2. Please respond to the initial question from the instructor. During the week, bounce off other students’ comments, or the instructor’s comments. By the end of the week, you should have an initial posting and 2 other postings based on other students or the instructor.

      3. Weekly Quiz: Take the first quiz- week one. It is auto graded

      4. No written assignment

      Instructor: Art Liebl
      Instructor email: aliebl@interpretersassociates.com

      Week starts: January 24, 2023 at 6AM
      Week ends: January 30 at midnight

      If you have any technical problems or questions: aliebl@interpretersassociates.com

    • #53402
      Avatar photoMargareth Cruz
      Participant

      Hi, my name is Margareth Cruz. I currently reside in Providence, Rhode Island. Spanish is my first language and I also speak English. I am also learning Brazilian Portuguese. I have decided to be an interpreter because for most of my life, I helped interpret for my parents on different occasions and have been interpreting for almost every job that I’ve had. The immigrant population in Rhode Island is large, especially the Hispanic/Latino population. I am currently an exercise specialist at a physical therapy clinic and I am the only Spanish-speaking worker in the clinic. Although I do not have any certification to validate my interpreting skills, I have been able to thoroughly explain and relay information from doctor to patient and vice-versa. Sometimes I struggle with using the correct and appropriate words while interpreting because I do not remember the word off the top of my head, but I have been able to demonstrate with my hands, point at certain body parts or, like previously stated, use a slang term to help the patient/client understand.

      There have been many instances where I’ve met Spanish-speaking patients who would just nod their head at their physical therapist and just do what the physical therapist does via exercise demonstrations and still not understand why they are doing what they are doing. For instance, a 49-year-old, male patient had attended the clinic 6 months prior to my on-boarding at the clinic. I met him because the physical therapist was struggling–using google translate– to help ‘translate’ what he was saying. Although the translation was correct and using the correct words, the patient was still not understanding due to his lack of education and knowledge of the subject. I stepped in (per request of the physical therapist) and was able to interpret what he was saying to the patient in a way that he would understand. Since then, he has been able to recover from his post-op injury perfectly fine because he was able to understand what was going on and what the doctor was asking of him.

      Becoming a medical interpreter and furthering my knowledge in the subject will help me better understand the field but also allow me to aid those who come from different countries and have a language barrier. By doing this, many people will be able to get the help that they need, be able to ask questions and get their questions answered, so on and so forth.

      • #53416
        Sherley Montes
        Participant

        Hi! I love that your first language is Spanish and you speak English but you are also learning how to speak Brazilian Portuguese! I agree that there is a high immigration population in Rhode Island which has created a great language barrier. I loved learning a bit about you and I look forward to reading your posts.

      • #53418
        Yasmin DeOliveira
        Participant

        Hi Margareth! Love to see that you want to learn Brazilian Portuguese, I am glad to be of any help on that! We have our languages in common so that sparked my interest while reading your post! I have never been to Rhode Island unfortunately, but similarly in Boston there is also a huge Hispanic/Latino population so I can only imagine the challenges faced in your area. Loved learning about you and our similarities, so nice to sorta meet you!

    • #53404
      Sherley Montes
      Participant

      My name is Sherley Montes. I was born and raised in Providence, Rhode Island. My first language is English but, I am also fluent in Spanish. My father is bilingual he speaks both English and Spanish. On the other hand, my mother only speaks spanish as well as most of my family members. Over the years, I have attended appointments with my mother and grandmother and realized how crucial a medical interpreter is for them. I remember attending an appointment with my grandmother who only speaks Spanish. She was in a situation where language barrier was an issue at the hospital and a medical interpreter was not provided. The doctors struggled to get her to understand one of her upcoming procedures. I could only do so much because I am not educated enough to interpret what was being said and what parts of her body needed attention. I remember how uncomfortable and confused she felt sitting in that doctor’s office. She went home nervous for her upcoming procedures and appointments because of the lack of understanding. Furthermore, over the past year, I have been attending physical therapy. There are many patients who only speak their native language. Therefore, they are accompanied by a family member or friend who is bilingual. I noticed one client who goes every week is provided with a medical interpreter who attends via zoom. The client is able to understand the exercises and information her physical therapist provides her. Therefore, I want to be a medical interpreter because I want to be able to help others and become educated on terms and more. I want others to be comfortable and confident that the information they receive is accurate and helpful to them. Lastly, I want clients to be able to have a two way communication and receive answers to any questions they may have without having to worry about confusion.

      • #53411
        Avatar photoMargareth Cruz
        Participant

        Hi Sherley,

        It’s great that you found a passion to help those who need it after experiencing what you did with a family member. I look forward to chatting soon.

      • #53419
        Yasmin DeOliveira
        Participant

        Hi Sherley! Very interesting to see we had such similar moments with our families, I too have bilingual parents and Portuguese only speaking family members so I totally understand having to go to appointments to translate. I love your reason for wanting to follow this career path, and so lovely to meet you! I look forward to talking!

    • #53405
      Yasmin DeOliveira
      Participant

      Hi! My name is Yasmin DeOliveira. I was born and currently live in Boston, Massachusetts. I am a proud Brazilian, but I have lived in both Portugal and Brazil. I am bilingual and speak Portuguese and English fluently, and I am very close to becoming trilingual as I have been perfecting my Spanish over the last few years. I have decided to become a medical interpreter because there are so many people, especially in my area, that are not fortunate enough to pick up English as a second language for a whole number of reasons. I have had to translate for my own grandmothers and other family members in so many situations throughout my life, and the one thing they always said was that I was so lucky to speak English. Over the years that sentence has grown on me in every aspect of my life, including work. I became a behavioral therapist for children with autism a few years ago, and I was immediately given all the Spanish and Portuguese speaking families and little ones. Over the years I have worked with the kids and their parents in translating all the activities required in their programs as well as all their doctors appointments. They were all so quickly dismissed at their previous appointments without me simply because there was no translator and nobody wanted to try and communicate or accommodate them and that kind of did it for me. That grew an impact on me after a while, and I finally realized I need to take my bilingual abilities somewhere everybody around me can also benefit from it. I now am able to fully translate appointments for them and see on a day to day basis the children and their families that thrive from getting the correct therapy they had been needing and had not been able to get due to a language barrier. I would love to become a medical interpreter and be able to fully understand all the correct information to pass on to others and not have to come up with words on the spot or juggle with what to say. Although many of us who are bilingual do not realize it, we are incredibly lucky to speak and understand another language. It makes me very happy to be able to use my skills in a way to help others.

      • #53410
        Avatar photoMargareth Cruz
        Participant

        Hi,

        Nice to meet you! I am currently studying Brazilian Portuguese because of the similarities in Spanish. I look forward to discussing with you throughout these 10 weeks.

      • #53417
        Sherley Montes
        Participant

        Hi! I find it very intriguing that you lived in Portugal and Brazil, that’s amazing! Also, that you are learning to be trilingual. I liked learning about you and you experiences with others. I look forward to reading your posts!

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